PSORIASIS and COMORBIDITIES and INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

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WHAT IS COMORBIDITY?

 Comorbidity is a concurrence of multiple diseases or disorders in association with a given disease, in this case, psoriasis.

INCREASED RISK

The patient with psoriasis has an increased risk of developing one or more of a number of other diseases/conditions that share many immunological features with psoriasis.

CHART 1: Comorbidities Associated with Psoriasis

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) –

Crohn’s Disease

Ulcerative Colitis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

1, 2, 3

Gastro Intestinal (GI) disorders are present in 28% of patients with psoriasis. Common abnormalities in psoriasis patients include changes in the mucous membrane of the duodenum. Psoriasis may cause dermatogenic enteropathy and intestinal inflammation.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common ‘functional’ gastrointestinal disorders accounting for 3% of all primary care consultations, with a strong female predominance. The main features are recurrent abdominal pain and/or discomfort, whose clear relationship to changes in stool frequency or consistency and its relief by defecation implies that they originate in the colon. In addition to these gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, patients commonly report non-GI symptoms of lassitude, headache, backache, dysmenorrhoea (painful periods/menstruation), and dyspareunia (painful intercourse). Symptoms characteristically wax and wane. IBS patients, in common with other sufferers with functional GI disorders, are more anxious than healthy controls, showing greater anxiety and depression. Many patients believe that stress induces their symptoms.10

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are a group of inflammatory conditions in which the body’s own immune system attacks parts of the digestive system. The two major types of IBD are ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). UC is limited to the colon and/or rectum (normally continuous lesions in the rectum and colon), and affects only the inner lining (mucosal and submucosal layers) of the gut. In contrast, CD can affect any part of the gut from mouth to anus as non-continuous or skip lesions (a majority of cases start in the terminal ileum), and affect the whole thickness of the bowel wall.4

stomach_etc_diagram-en-wikkip

Within the IBD group is also Microscopic Colitis, an inflammation of the colon that can only be detected with a microscope. There are two types of microscopic colitis – collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis. Under a microscope an increase in the number of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, can be seen in the epithelium—the layer of cells that lines the colon.15

The two types of colitis affect the colon tissue in slightly different ways:

  • Lymphocytic colitis – The number of lymphocytes is higher, whilst the tissues and lining of the colon are of normal thickness.
  • Collagenous colitis – The layer of collagen, a threadlike protein, underneath the epithelium builds up and becomes thicker than normal.

 The most common symptom of microscopic colitis is chronic, foul smelling, watery, non-bloody diarrhoea. Episodes of diarrhoea may last for weeks, months, or if chronic, even years, however, there may be intermittent periods without diarrhoea. During these periods the patient may even experience bouts of constipation.

Other signs and symptoms of microscopic colitis include15:-

  • A strong urgency to have a bowel movement.
  • Faecal incontinence – accidental passing of stool or fluid from the rectum – especially at night.
  • Pain, cramps, or bloating in the abdomen – that is usually mild but can be incapacitating.
  • Weight loss/gain
  • Nausea – usually without vomiting.
  • Dehydration – as a result from not drinking enough liquids to replace fluids lost through diarrhoea.
IBD SYMPTOMSIBS SYMPTOMS
Frequent and/or Urgent Bowel Movements

Diaorrhea

Bloody Stools

Abdominal Pain & Cramping

Fatigue

Weight Loss

Lack of Appetite

Joint, Skin or Eye Problems

Abdominal Pain & Cramping

Diaorrhea

Bloating

Gas

Mucus in Stools

 

As far back as 1968 studies reported a prevalence of 2-3% of psoriasis in first-degree relatives of patients with CD compared to 0–3% of controls. Later studies found psoriasis in 7–11% of the IBD population compared to 1–2% of general population. In one study, psoriasis was found to be more prevalent in CD (11.2%) than UC (5.7%). 5

In one study5 the Researchers studied the presence and characteristics of psoriasis were recorded and further classified as follows: sebopsoriasis, scalp psoriasis, plaque type psoriasis [trunk, arms], palmo-plantar psoriasis, nail psoriasis, inverse psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, guttate psoriasis, and pustular psoriasis. Psoriasis that developed after anti-TNF? treatments was also reported. Severity of psoriasis was defined as mild, moderate or severe [not applied to psoriatic arthritis]. The study involved some 251 IBD patients, there were 158 patients with CD [63%] and 93 with UC [37%]. These 251 IBD patients were referred to the dermatologist and psoriasis was detected in 62 [25%], including 36 [58%] with CD and 26 [42%] with UC. The non-IBD group included 62 patients with psoriasis. Mild psoriasis was more frequent in IBD vs non-IBD, whereas moderate and severe psoriasis were more frequent in non-IBD vs IBD. Plaque-type psoriasis was the most common phenotype in both IBD and non-IBD. The frequency of plaque-type, nail psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis was lower in IBD vs non-IBD.

Other researchers analyzed the health records of 174,646 participants from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and NHS II in an effort to also determine whether IBD was associated with specific psoriasis phenotypes. In this study they found 4,400 cases of psoriasis and of these 423 participants had developed CD or UC with a prevalence of psoriasis that was four to six times greater in IBD patients than the estimated prevalence in the general public.6

Several neutralizing anti-TNF agents, such as etanercept and infliximab, have been successfully used to treat autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. However, paradoxically, Infliximab and adalimumab-induced psoriasis in Crohn’s disease has been identified as a side effect of TNF-alpha inhibitor therapy. Researchers reviewed 142 case articles of new-onset psoriasis with infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept therapy and of these confirmed eighty-one cases of infliximab induced psoriasis.7 In another study the researchers found that the vast majority of the cases (76%) developed psoriasis while on infliximab, and the rest (24%) after switching to adalimumab or certolizumab, indicating that this phenomenon is not drug specific, but rather a pharmacological group effect 12

 In another systematic literature review Researcher reviewed 222 cases. Of the 222 patients, 78.38% were diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, and 48.20% were female. The mean patient age was 26.50 years, and 70.72% of patients had no prior history of psoriasis. Infliximab was the anti-TNF-? therapy that caused the cutaneous reaction in most patients (69.37%). Clinical presentation varied; psoriasis-form lesions were the most common form of psoriasis (55.86%), followed by typical plaque type lesions (20.72%), and pustular-type lesions (3.60%). Six patients (2.70%) concomitantly presented with alopecia, one patient (0.45%) presented with palmoplantar pustulosis, and another patient (0.45%) presented with palmoplantar pustulosis and psoriatic arthritis.9

 Celiac disease is defined as a disease of the small intestine characterized by mucosal inflammation, villous atrophy, and crypt hyperplasia upon exposure to dietary gluten. Several studies have found that psoriasis patients are at an increased risk for celiac disease. A retrospective cohort study compared 25,341 psoriasis patients to over 125,000 matched controls in the U.S. The comparison data showed an odds ratio of 2.2 for the association of psoriasis with celiac disease. They also examined whether patients with celiac disease also have increased risk of psoriasis. A cohort of 28,958 biopsy-confirmed celiac disease patients from Sweden was evaluated for risk of future psoriasis compared to 143,910 age and sex-matched controls. The authors found a positive correlation between celiac disease antibody positivity and an increase in the severity of psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Interestingly, in the psoriasis patients, elevated celiac disease antibodies did not necessarily correspond to a biopsy-confirmed diagnosis of celiac disease, suggesting that psoriasis may be associated with gluten “sensitivity” (marked by antibody positivity) but not necessarily fully developed Celiac disease.10

In summary both Psoriasis and IBD and IBS are related inflammatory diseases. The skin and bowel represent both barrier and connection between the inner and the outer sides of the body. On average approximately 25% of patients who experience some form of bowel complaint will be diagnosed with psoriasis. It is also interesting to note that smoking in both IBD/IBS and psoriasis is considered an exacerbating trigger.

REFERENCES

  • Arzu K?l?ç, Seray Cakmak; PSORIASIS AND COMORBIDITIES; EMJ Dermatol. 2013;1:78-85.
  • Howa Yeung et al.;Psoriasis Severity and the Prevalence of Major Medical Comorbidity – A Population-Based Study; JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(10):1173-1179. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.5015
  • Aurangabadkar SJ. Comorbidities in psoriasis. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2013;79, Suppl S1:10-7
  • Huang B.L. et al.; Skin manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease; Frontiers in Physiology; www.frontiersin.org February 2012 | Volume 3 | Article 13 | 1
  • Skroza et al.; Correlations between Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Hindawi Publishing Corporation BioMed Research International Volume 2013, Article ID 983902, 8 pages ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/983902
  • Lolli E. et al.; Psoriasis Phenotype in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Case-Control Prospective Study; Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis, 2015, 699–707 doi:10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv068 Advanced Access publication April 23, 2015
  • Li W.Q. et al.; Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and increased risk of incident Crohn’s disease in US women; Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 July ; 72(7): 1200–1205. doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202143
  • Famenini S. and Wu J.J.; Infliximab-Induced Psoriasis in Treatment of Crohn’s Disease-Associated Ankylosing Spondylitis: Case Report and Review of 142 Cases; J Drugs Dermatol.2013;12(8):939-943.
  • Denadai R .et al.; REVIEW ARTICLE Induction or exacerbation of psoriatic lesions during anti-TNF-? therapy for inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic literature review based on 222 cases; Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis (2013) 7, 517–524
  • Bhatia B.K. et al.; Diet and Psoriasis: Part 2. Celiac Disease and Role of a Gluten Free Diet; J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014 August ; 71(2): 350–358. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2014.03.017.
  • Spiller R.C.; Irritable bowel syndrome; Published Online March 14, 2005; British Medical Bulletin 2004; 72: 15–29
  • Longstreth GF, Thompson WG, Chey WD, Houghton LA, Mearin F, Spiller RC. Functional bowel disorders. Gastroenterology. 2006 Apr. 130(5):1480-91.
  • Bercik P. et al.; Is irritable bowel syndrome a low-grade inflammatory bowel disease?; Gastroenterol Clin North Am.2005 Jun;34(2):235-45, vi-vii.
  • Gionata Fiorino , Paolo D. Omodei; Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?; Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis, 2015, 1–2
  • Microscopic colitis. Mayo Clinic website.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/microscopic-colitis/home/ovc-20192308

PSORIASIS AND COMORBIDITIES – Occular Inflammation

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WHAT IS COMORBIDITY?

 Comorbidity is a concurrence of multiple diseases or disorders in association with a given disease, in this case, #psoriasis.

 INCREASED RISK

 The patient with psoriasis has an increased risk of developing one or more of a number of other diseases/conditions that share many immunological features with psoriasis.

 CHART 1: Comorbidities Associated with Psoriasis

Occular Inflammation –

Iritis

Uveitis

Episcleritis

Conjunctivitis

1, 2, 3

Ocular Inflammation

eye-1516983  episcleritis-eye

Overall, ophthalmological manifestations occur in about 10% of the cases of psoriasis and include blepharitis, conjunctivitis, keratitis, xerophthalmia (a medical condition in which the eye fails to produce tears), corneal abscess, cataract, orbital myositis (inflammation of the eye muscles), symblepharon (adhesion of the eyelid to the eyeball), chorioretinopathy (detachment of the retina), uveitis and ectropion with trichiasis (inwardly growing eyelashes) and madarosis (loss of eyelashes) secondary to eyelid involvement. 1,2

Uveitis

Although the etiology of psoriasis and its association with ocular disease remains unknown, it has been suggested that activated neutrophils in peripheral blood may be responsible for the attacks of anterior uveitis associated with psoriatic arthritis. Uveitis tends to develop more often in patients with arthropathy or psoriasis pustulosa rather than the other forms of psoriasis. Psoriasis patients with uveitis tend to be older than those without psoriasis. 1,2

Uveitis is characterized by an intraocular inflammatory process resulting from various causes. Individual forms of uveitis may be differentiated as a function of the location of the inflammation within the eye, symmetry and continuity of the inflammation, associated complication and distribution of cells along the corneal endothelium. 1,2

schematic_diagram_of_the_human_eye_en-edit

The uvea is the mid-portion of the eye. Its anterior portion includes the iris and the ciliary muscle, and its posterior portion consists of the choroid. Anterior uveitis or iritis is the inflammation of the anterior uveal tract. When the adjacent ciliary body is also affected, the process is known as iridocyclitis. Anterior uveitis is four times more common than posterior uveitis.

Uveitis can be divided into four main subgroups according to the etiology of the inflammation – infectious disease, immune-mediated disease, syndromes limited to the eyes or idiopathic forms. Of the patients with uveitis, around 40% of cases are secondary to an immune-mediated disease; around 30% of the cases of uveitis do not fit into any well-defined etiology. 1,2

Uveitis may occur in 7-20% of the patients with psoriasis. In a cross-sectional study researchers found a prevalence of uveitis of 2% in patients with psoriasis irrespective of the severity of the dermatosis. The association between uveitis and chronic plaque psoriasis has also been found, and in these patients uveitis tends to be bilateral affecting both eyes), prolonged and more severe. Uveitis, particularly anterior uveitis, has also been associated with the arthropathic form of the disease and approximately 7% of the patients with psoriatic arthritis may develop uveitis. Some cases of uveitis have been reported to occur even before psoriatic skin disease, and uveitis has been reported as the first presenting sign of Spondyloarthropathies (SpAs – a family of long-term (chronic) diseases of joints) in up to 11.4% of cases. The severity of ocular inflammation does not necessarily correlate with extent of joint findings but may correlate with skin disease. 1,2

Stephen Bafico

Conjunctivitis is a commonly occurring eye condition that can be caused by psoriasis, but it is more commonly due to allergies, bacterial infection, or viral infection. The most common presentation is generalized conjunctival injection with mild photophobia, gritty discomfort, and possible discharge. Thick purulent (pus-like) discharge is a hallmark of bacterial infection and watery discharge is characteristic of viral infections. Increased rates of obstructive meibomian (tarsal – sebaceous gland at the rim of the eyelids) dysfunction were noted in psoriatic patients. Published articles have suggested conjunctivitis prevalence rates in psoriasis patients as high as 64.5%.4

allergicconjunctivitis

Dry eye (Keratoconjunctivitis sicca – Dry Eye Syndrome) has been cited at a prevalence rate of 2.7% of psoriatic arthritis patients. Studies have suggested prevalence rates of dry eyes as high as 18.00% of psoriasis patients.4

 Facial psoriasis can of course present on the eyebrows and on the eyelids.

psoriasis-eye-before psoriasis-eye-after

      Facial Psoriasis – Before                                 Facial Psoriasis – After

When psoriasis affects eyelids or eyelashes, these may become covered with fine plaques and the rims of the eyelids may become red and crusty. If the rims of the eyelids are irritated for long periods of time, the rims of the lids may turn up or down (Ectropion). If the rims turn down, the lashes have a tendency to rub against the surface of the eye and cause further irritation and possibly damage to the surface of the eye.

Psoriatic eye manifestations, uveitis in particular, can lead to serious consequences, including vision loss. It is important at the first sign of occular redness, weeping, blurred vision, for psoriasis sufferers to see their Practitioner immediately, as they may need to be referred to an Ophthalmologist depending upon the severity of the symptoms.

 

REFERENCES

  • Arzu K?l?ç, Seray Cakmak; PSORIASIS AND COMORBIDITIES; EMJ Dermatol. 2013;1:78-85.
  • Howa Yeung et al.;Psoriasis Severity and the Prevalence of Major Medical Comorbidity – A Population-Based Study; JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(10):1173-1179. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.5015
  • Aurangabadkar SJ. Comorbidities in psoriasis. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2013;79, Suppl S1:10-7
  • Shiu-chung Au et al.; Psoriatic Eye Manifestations; FALL 2011; psoriasis forum, Vol. 17, No. 3; https://www.psoriasis.org/files/pdfs/forum/Psoriatic-Eye-Manifestations-Forum_Fall_11_WEB.pdf
  • Naiara Abreu de Azevedo Fraga et al.; Psoriasis and uveitis: a literature review; An Bras Dermatol. 2012;87(6):877-83. http://www.scielo.br/pdf/abd/v87n6/v87n6a09.pdf

 

PSORIASIS AND COMORBIDITIES

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WHAT IS COMORBIDITY?

Comorbidity is a concurrence of multiple diseases or disorders in association with a given disease, in this case, psoriasis.

INCREASED RISK

The patient with psoriasis has an increased risk of developing one or more of a number of other diseases/conditions that share many immunological features with psoriasis.

CHART 1: Comorbidities Associated with Psoriasis

Occular Inflammation –

Iritis

Uveitis

Episcleritis

Psychological and Psychiatric Disorders – Depression

anxiety

Suicide

Addiction

Inflammatory Bowel Disease –

Crohn’s Disease

Ulcerative Colitis

Celiac Disease

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Metabolic Syndrome –

Cardiovascular Disease – Arterial hypertension/ Atherosclerosis Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Lymphoma

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Sleep apnea

Celiac disease

Parkinson’s disease

Lymphomas

Insulin Resistant Diabetes

Obesity

Dyslipidemia (Raised cholesterol)

Psoriatic Arthritis

Spondyloarthropathies

Periodontitis

Desquamative gingivitis 

Fissured and geographical tongue 

Renal Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) 

1, 2, 3

Overall, ophthalmological (eye) problems occur in about 10% of the cases of psoriasis and include blepharitis, conjunctivitis, keratitis, xerophthalmia, corneal abscess, cataract, orbital myositis, symblepharon, chorioretinopathy, uveitis and ectropion with trichiasis and madarosis secondary to eyelid involvement.

The association between obesity and psoriasis has been the subject of several reviews and studies confirm that a positive correlation exists between body weight and the prevalence and severity of psoriasis. It has been proposed that psoriasis might lead to obesity through progressive social isolation, poor eating habits, depression, increased alcohol consumption, and decreased physical  activity (more pronounced in patients with psoriatic arthritis). But another hypothesis is that obesity predisposes patients to psoriasis.

Dollarphotoclub_89167346 Obesity dollarphotoclub_78137972-liver-disease dollarphotoclub_92450146-diabetes

It is considered, however, that the low-grade chronic proinflammatory state present in both these conditions increases the risk of comorbidity, including a higher likelihood of developing diabetes or metabolic syndrome, and an increase in cardiovascular disease. 6

It is very important for newly diagnosed psoriasis patients to be screened for diabetes, liver disease, renal disease, and dyslipidaemia (high cholesterol) at the time of diagnosis, due to the fact that treatment for psoriasis may complicate treatment for the comorbid condition, or the comorbid condition may complicate the treatment for psoriasis.

SSNHL is defined as hearing loss of at least 30 dB (decibels) in 3 sequential frequencies in the standard pure tone audiogram for 3 days or less. The condition has an estimated incidence of between 5 and 30 cases per 100,000 per year. According to background information provided by the study authors, the average age at which SSNHL occurs is 50 to 60 years, and it equally affects men and women. Most cases are unilateral (one ear), with only 5% being bilateral (two ear involvement). The condition can be mild, moderate, or severe to profound and can affect high, low, or all frequencies. Tinnitus occurs in about 80% of patients and vertigo in about 30%. Up to 80% of patients report a feeling of ear fullness.7 Auto-immunity is described as an etiology of Sudden or Progressive Sensory neural Hearing Loss; similarly autoimmunity is described as an etiology for many skin diseases like Psoriasis etc. In one study researchers found that Psoriasis patients have, after 6 years of follow up; a 1.51 times higher risk incidence of developing SSNHL than those in the control group.8

For psoriasis patients who have had their psoriasis for several years, it is important that they have a yearly medical check up to ensure that they have not developed any comorbid conditions.

Changing one’s lifestyle may also be of benefit in either delaying comorbidity, or in controlling both their psoriasis and their comorbid condition. Such changes would include cessation of smoking, reducing or ceasing intake of alcohol, reducing sugar intake, changing ones diet to include more green vegetables, less red meat and if obese, losing weight.

 Read our BLOGS – Psoriasis and Diet – Part 1 and 2, Psoriasis and Alcohol, Psoriasis and Smoking

REFERENCES

  • Arzu K?l?ç, Seray Cakmak; PSORIASIS AND COMORBIDITIES; EMJ Dermatol. 2013;1:78-85.
  • Howa Yeung et al.;Psoriasis Severity and the Prevalence of Major Medical Comorbidity – A Population-Based Study; JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(10):1173-1179. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.5015
  • Aurangabadkar SJ. Comorbidities in psoriasis. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2013;79, Suppl S1:10-7
  • Agnieszka B. Owczarczyk-Saczonek , Roman Nowicki; The association between smoking and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with psoriasis aged 30 to 49 years; Postep Derm Alergol 2015; XXXII (5): 331–336 DOI: 10.5114/pdia.2015.54743
  • Dediol I. et al.; ASSOCIATION OF PSORIASIS AND ALCOHOLISM: PSYCHODERMATOLOGICAL ISSUE; Psychiatria Danubina, 2009; Vol. 21, No. 1, pp 9–13
  • Carrascosa J.M. et al.; Obesity and Psoriasis: Inflammatory Nature of Obesity, Relationship Between Psoriasis and Obesity, and Therapeutic Implications; Actas Dermosifiliogr.2014;105:31-44 – Vol. 105 Num.1 DOI: 10.1016/j.adengl.2012.08.024
  • Schreiber BE. et al.; Sudden sensorineural hearing loss.; Lancet.2010 Apr 3;375(9721):1203-11. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)62071-7.
  • Sesha Prasad, M. Sreedhar Rao, A. V. S. Hanumantha Rao, D. Satyanarayana, S. Muneeruddin Ahmed, M. Mahendra Kumar. “Audiological Evaluation in Auto: Immune Skin Diseases- A Clinical Study of 124 Patients”. Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental Sciences 2015; Vol. 4, Issue 30, April 13; Page: 5128-5137, DOI: 10.14260/jemds/2015/749

 

ATOPIC DERMATITIS (ECZEMA) AND COMORBIDITIES

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Atopic dermatitis (AD), also known as atopic eczema, is a chronic inflammatory disorder that causes significant morbidity and has a wide range of allergic and non-allergic comorbid disorders.

Comorbidity is a concurrence of multiple diseases or disorders in association with a given disease. The patient with AD has an increased risk of developing one or more of a number of other diseases/conditions that share many immunological features with AD.

 CHART 1: Comorbidities Associated with AD

Cutaneous (skin) infections including:-

Bacterial – Staphylococcal   / Impetigo contagiosum

Viral – eczema herpeticum

Fungal

 

Other Skin Conditions:

Vitiligo

Psychological and Psychiatric Disorders – Depression

Anxiety

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD)

Food Allergies/Intolerances Cardiovascular Disease – Arterial hypertension/ Atherosclerosis

Stroke

Prediabetes

Diabetes

Obesity

Fatty Liver

Dyslipidemia (Raised cholesterol)

Allergic conjunctivitis

Cataracts 

Atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) 

Allergic rhinitis

Hayfever

Asthma

Acute upper respiratory infection

Acute pharyngitis

Fatigue, insomnia  

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Most cases of AD begin in childhood or adolescence, with more than 80% of pediatric patients having persistent symptoms of itch and dry skin in adulthood. The early age of onset and disease chronicity, plus impaired quality of life, secondary to AD weigh heavily on a child’s psychological and behavioural development, with delayed social development throughout life and very high rates of psychological and behavioural disorders and quality-of-life impairment.6 Various studies have consistently indicated an association between AD and ADHD which is independent of environmental exposures and other comorbidities. Particularly infant AD appears to be associated with later development of ADHD symptoms. Sleeping problems due to AD are suggested as playing an important role for the observed association between AD and ADHD. Children with previous or prevalent AD have an approximately 43 % increased risk to be diagnosed with ADHD or to display clinical ADHD symptoms.8

Researchers have found that adults with AD have higher rates of cigarette smoking, consumption of alcoholic, lower rates of exercise, and higher classification of obesity with category II / III consistently indicated in children and adults, hypertension, prediabetes, diabetes, and high cholesterol.6, 7

staph-infection

Bacterial superinfection by staphylococcal aureus is the most common complication in atopic dermatitis and is almost always present in AD flares.  S. aureus is an important human pathogen that causes a variety of  infections ranging from localised skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) to severe necrotising fasciitis and life-threatening infections.7 , 8  S. aureus can be isolatedfrom 55–75% of unaffected AE skin, 85–91% of chronic lichenified lesions and 80–100% of acute exudative skin lesions.9 The correlation between AD severity and colonization with S. aureus has already been well documented, and it is generally known that this colonization is an important mechanism involved in the continued aggravation of the disease in patients.

S. aureus has shown a capacity to develop resistance to antimicrobials that were originally active against the species. In 1961, there were reports of strains that were methicillin resistant, and they were called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). By 1980, MRSA strains became an endemic problem in hospitals in several countries. Reports on MRSA infections in AD patients have been published since 2005. Some authors suggest that MRSA should be considered when patients with AD present with more intense and generalized erythemas (redness of the skin), and with the predominant location of infection in these patients being the face, and a fetid (fishy) odour present. Studies worldwide suggest that the prevalence of MRSA in the population with AD varies from 0 to 30.8% depending upon the country of research.10

Colonization by streptococcus generally precedes the development of impetignized lesions (by about 10 days). Group A streptococci often colonize the pharynx of asymptomatic people, especially school-age children. In cases of infected atopic dermatitis lesions, a high prevalence of co-infection by staphylococci and streptococci was reported, and these bacteria were present in about 70 to 85% of patients. B-hemolytic streptococci are the main cause of impetigo and are more commonly isolated on the skin of people with AD than on the skin of healthy individuals or of those with other skin diseases.11

Eczema herpeticum (EH) is caused by Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), Herpes zoster virus, Coxsackie virus, etc. Also, EH may occur in children who have AD after smallpox vaccination. If corticosteroid therapy is used in these patients because of misdiagnosis, the lesions may worsen. Therefore, if skin lesions or another pre-existing dermatitis is aggravated after varicella (smallpox) infection then EH must be considered and antiviral therapy must be started immediately.11

AD, is an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated disease with a complex etiology (cause) that is accompanied by superficial inflammation and itchy rashes. An association with asthma and Allergic rhinitis (Hayfever) is well documented. Fifty percent of all those with AD develop other allergic symptoms within their first year of life. In the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), among the 56 countries, the prevalence of AD in children varied significantly from 0.3% to 20.5% but shows consistent trends in increasing disease prevalence over time. The main risk factors for progression and persistence of asthma are early onset, IgE sensitization, and severity of AD. Approximate 70% of patients with severe AD develop asthma compared with 20-30% of patients with mild AD and approximately 8% in the general population. Epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated strong associations between rhinitis and asthma. Recent clinical and basic science evidence indicated that the two diseases share anatomical, physiological, immuno-pathological, and therapeutical factors. Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory condition affecting nasal mucosal membranes. In sensitized individuals, allergens such as pollens, moulds, and animal dander provoke this allergic response.12, 13

The relationship between food allergy and AD is complex and the presence of food sensitization and allergy earlier in life predicts a prognosis of severe AD. Around 50–70% of children with an early onset of AD are sensitized to one or more allergens. These are mainly food allergens (cow’s milk, hen’s egg and peanuts being the foods most frequently involved). Food allergy is actually much more common in children with AD with studies reporting ranges from 20 to 80% of children being affected.12,13

Allergic conjunctivitis (AC), either seasonal and/or perennial, is one of the most common types of ocular inflammation which causes redness and swelling of the eyes. Estimates vary, but these types of allergy are said to affect at least 15–20% of the population and higher incidences in those with AD. Its pathophysiology also involves a type I IgE-mediated immune reaction triggered by allergens contacting surface of the eye.2 Atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) is a bilateral chronic inflammatory disease of the ocular surface and eyelid. Its pathomechanism involves both a chronic degranulation of the mast cell mediated by IgE, and immune mechanisms mediated by Th1- and Th2-lymphocyte derived cytokines. It is considered the ocular counterpart of AD. Eczematous lesions may be found on the eyelids, or any place on the body. Skin lesions are red and elevated. They often occur in the antecubital (inner elbow) or popliteal (behind the knees) regions. Typically, eczematous lesions are itchy, and scratching them makes them itchier. Ocular findings vary. The eyelid skin may be chemotic (inflamed eyelid) with a fine sandpaper-like texture. There may be mild, or severe, red and swollen eyes.14

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact our clinic by either emailing us at info@goodskincare.com.au or message us on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/PsoriasisEczemaClinic/

 

 REFERENCES

  • Simpson EL.; Comorbidity in Atopic Dermatitis; Curr Dermatol Rep. 2012 March 1; 1(1): 29–38. doi:10.1007/s13671-011-0003-5
  • Augustin M. et al.; Epidemiology and Comorbidity in Children with Psoriasis and Atopic Eczema; Dermatology 2015;231:35–40 DOI: 10.1159/000381913
  • Deckert S. et al.; Nonallergic comorbidities of atopic eczema: an overview of systematic reviews; Allergy 69 (2014) 37–45 © 2013
  • Ellis CN. et al.; Validation of Expert Opinion in Identifying Comorbidities Associated with Atopic Dermatitis/Eczema; Pharmacoeconomics 2003; 21 (12)
  • Gradman J. et al.; Allergic conjunctivitis in children with asthma, rhinitis and eczema in a secondary outpatient clinic.
  • Silverberg J.I.; Eczema and cardiovascular risk factors in 2 US adult population studies; J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015;135:721-8.
  • Silverberg J.I. and Silverberg N.B.; Atopic Dermatitis: Update on Pathogenesis and Comorbidities
  • Baviera G. et al.; Staphylococcus Aureus And Atopic Dermatitis: Which Came First, The Chicken Or The Egg?; EMJ Dermatol. 2015;3[1]:92-97.
  • Leung DYM.; The role of Staphylococcus aureus in atopic eczema; Acta Derm Venereol 2008; Suppl 216: 21–27
  • Petry V. et al.; Bacterial skin colonization and infections in patients with atopic dermatitis; An Bras Dermatol. 2012;87(5):729-34.
  • Celtik C. et al.; A Life-Threatening Condition In A Child With Chicken Pox: Eczema Herpeticum; Open Journal of Pediatrics 1 (2011) 1-3
  • Tao Zheng et al.; The Atopic March: Progression from Atopic Dermatitis to Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma; Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2011 April;3(2):67-73. doi: 10.4168/aair.2011.3.2.67
  • Nutten S.; Atopic Dermatitis: Global Epidemiology and Risk Factors; Ann Nutr Metab 2015;66(suppl 1):8–16
  • La Rosa M. et al.; Allergic conjunctivitis: a comprehensive review of the literature; Italian Journal of Pediatrics 2013, 39:18 http://www.ijponline.net/content/39/1/18

PSORIASIS and SMOKING

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Tobacco smoke contains numerous chemicals that exert inflammatory effects on the human body. Recent studies suggest that cigarette smoking may trigger the development of psoriasis through oxidative, inflammatory and genetic mechanisms. Smoking initiates formation of free radicals that stimulate cell signalling pathways active in psoriasis. Smoking damages the skin by increasing formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreasing the gene expression of antioxidants. Nicotine also stimulates innate immune cells integral to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. This perpetuates a cycle of chronic inflammation. Smoking also enhances expression of genes known to increase the risk of psoriasis.1,2,5

Research has found that increased smoking intensity corresponds to a higher risk of developing severe psoriasis whilst  longer cumulative duration of smoking (pack-years) increases the likelihood of developing psoriasis. The study also demonstrated a graded increase in psoriasis risk with increasing exposure to passive smoke.                              

In one study, researchers investigated the associations between smoking status, quantity,duration, and cessation and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and the risk of incident psoriasis in a total population of 185,836 participants from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II), and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study (HPFS). They reported that in the NHS, 20% of the cases of incident psoriasis might have been prevented by the elimination of smoking. Similarly, the population-attributable risk was 15% in the NHS II and 19% in the HPFS. For all participants, 17.5% of the incidents of psoriasis were attributable to having ever smoked. Evidence from past association studies seemed to indicate a stronger association between smoking and psoriasis in women than in men.3

Research has also shown that the risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked daily. Studies have shown that smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day by men who are psoriasis patients may be associated with a more severe expression of disease in their extremities. In addition, smoking among both men and women who are psoriasis patients has been shown to reduce improvement rates and hence difficulty in achieving remission during treatment.4 In a multicentre case-control study of 404 psoriasis patients and 616 controls, the risk for psoriasis was higher in smokers compared with non-smokers, and the association with smoking was stronger and more consistent among women than men. A particularly strong association was also found between smoking more than 15 cigarettes per day and Palmoplantar Pustular Psoriasis (PPP). Several observational and case-control studies have demonstrated up to 94% prevalence of tobacco use in patients with PPP.6 

Smoking

As tobacco smoking also interferes with the bodies immunity by allowing colonization by perio -dontopathic bacteria and by acting as a local irritant, researchers have hypothesized that smoking may act as a trigger or permissive factor of periodontal disease in patients suffering from psoriasis. In order to test this hypothesis, the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease, Researchers assessed a group of smoking and non-smoking psoriasis patients and a group of smoking and non-smoking psoriasis-free controls. In this study it was statistically shown that psoriasis patients who smoke are at an approximately sixfold higher risk of developing severe periodontal disease, as compared to psoriasis patients who do not smoke.7

Another interesting observation was the frequent coexistence of a smoking habit and alcohol consumption in patients with psoriasis. In the literature, alcohol consumption has been described as a factor responsible for triggering psoriasis, but it is said that smoking increases the risk of the onset of the disease. Previous studies have indicated that smokers who drink are twice as likely to develop the disease as non-smokers and non-drinkers.8,9

It is well recognized that stress and anxiety acts in both the initiation and exacerbation of psoriasis. Psychosocial stressors include acute negative life events or chronic strains and have been implicated as risk factors for tobacco use. Psychological stress may influence smoking behaviour (e.g., initiation, maintenance, and relapse) through a number of mechanisms. Specifically, smoking may function as a coping behaviour, whereby nicotine is used to self-medicate in response to stress; it is also possible that exposure to stress may result in diminished self-regulation to control the urge to smoke. Previous observational studies illustrate that acute stressful events and greater exposure to chronic stressors (e.g., related to work, finances, or relationships) are associated with higher smoking prevalence compared to persons who did not experience these stressors.10

So in summary, studies suggest that cigarette smoking may trigger the development of psoriasis through oxidative, inflammatory and genetic mechanisms. Furthermore, smoking is associated with the clinical severity of psoriasis. Smoking also contributes to higher morbidity and mortality from smoking related disorders in these patients. It is, therefore, advisable, if possible to quit smoking, or at the very least, keep your smoking to a minimum, preferably under 10 cigarettes a day. Try to adopt other mechanisms to cope with your stress and anxiety and it is suggested that you read our other blogs on “Simple Physical and Mental Relaxation Techniques”.  Using these techniques you may be able to reduce your stress and anxiety levels and this may allow you to cut down on the number of cigarettes you smoke.

Also read our blog “Psoriasis and Alcohol Intake”, “Stress, Anxiety, Depression and Psoriasis”, “Stressed about Psoriasis – Identify Your Stressors and Yours Stress Responses”, “Simple Physical Relaxation Techniques for Psoriasis Patients” and  “Simple Mental/Mind Relaxation Techniques Part 1 and Part 2”

REFERENCES

  • Armstrong AW, Armstrong EJ, Fuller EN, et al. Smoking and pathogenesis of psoriasis. Br J Dermatol 2011; 165: 1162-8.
  • Al-Rubaii A, Al-Ward N, Al-Waiz M. The age of onset of psoriasis and its relationship to smoking habits and stressful life events. Saudi Med J2003; 24:108.
  • Wenqing Li et al.; Smoking and Risk of Incident Psoriasis Among Women and Men in the United States: A Combined Analysis; American Journal of Epidemiology Advance Access published January 12, 2012; http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/01/11/aje.kwr325.full.pdf+html
  • Behnam SM,Behnam SE, Koo JY.; Smoking and psoriasis.; Skinmed. 2005 May-Jun;4(3):174-6.
  • Armstrong AW, ; Psoriasis and smoking: a systematic review and meta-analysis; British Journal of DermatologyVolume 170, Issue 2, Article first published online: 18 FEB 2014
  • Freiman A. et al.; Cutaneous Effects of Smoking; Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery Volume 8 Number 6 December 2004
  • Antal M. et al.; Smoking as a Permissive Factor of Periodontal Disease in Psoriasis; PLOS ONE | www.plosone.org; March 2014 | Volume 9 | Issue 3 | e92333
  • Agnieszka B. Owczarczyk-Saczonek , Roman Nowicki; The association between smoking and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with psoriasis aged 30 to 49 years; Postep Derm Alergol 2015; XXXII (5): 331–336 DOI: 10.5114/pdia.2015.54743
  • Naldi L, Peli L, Parazzini F. Association of early-stage psoriasis with smoking and male alcohol consumption: evidence from an Italian case-control study. Arch Dermatol1999; 135:1479–84.
  • Slopen N. et al.; Psychosocial stress and cigarette smoking persistence, cessation, and relapse over 9–10 years: a prospective study of middle-aged adults in the United States; Cancer Causes Control DOI 10.1007/s10552-013-0262-5